Archives for posts with tag: video

Take a few minutes and watch this TED Talk. Anand Varma has some incredible imagery in his time lapse videos of a bee egg becoming a worker bee.

This talk discusses threats to bees, including Varroa Destructor mites. Look for more of Varma’s photographs in the May 2015 issue of National Geographic.

Here’s a great little video that I stumbled upon today. Let’s ask a Monsanto lobbyist if Glyphosate is safe to drink. He sure talks the talk, but find out whether he can walk the walk:

I’ve caught my fair share of bee swarms and I’ve learned to watch for signs that a capture was successful. A typical honeybee swarm contains between 10,000 to 30,000 bees. When you shake the swarm into a box or container, there is a really good chance that you’ll get the queen (the odds are in your favour). However, if the queen takes flight before you seal up your box, then the rest of the swarm will know within minutes that she is not there.

The above video shows what happens if you don’t manage to capture the queen. We had to try four times before successfully capturing her in the box. The moment that she was inside, the rest of the bees stopped around the entrance and created a fanning chain, distributing her pheromones into the air for the rest of the bees to follow.

If you see a swarm of honeybees in your area, contact me through the form at the bottom of my swarm page and I’ll help put you in touch with a beekeeper who will remove them.

I recently discovered that my Langstroth hives have both died over this past winter. In the video above, I perform an autopsy on the hives to try and determine what killed them.

In the first hive, it looks like the bees may have starved after a really long and cold winter. I believe I missed an opportunity to feed them in early spring. They only had a tiny bit of honey left and it was on the opposite side of the hive. In the second colony, I actually removed 10 full frames of honey from the two deep boxes – more than enough to survive the winter. I suspect the chalkbrood that had plagued them in the fall didn’t allow them to build up their colony to a size that was necessary to survive the winter.

I’ll be on the lookout for swarms this spring to get new bees to populate these sad, empty hives.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGcYV8CW1XU&w=700]

Yesterday I checked in on the bees that I captured last Friday. In exactly 4 days, they have drawn comb on 7 bars, they have collected nectar and pollen, and the queen has been busy laying eggs. Bees continue to amaze me.

Just in case you missed it, here’s the swarm capture video.